Waverley Madden, Esquire


The Cost of Doing Nothing | Immigration Policy Center

The Cost of Doing NothingDollars, Lives, and Opportunities Lost in the Wait for Immigration ReformImmigration reform is a topic that has been heavily debated in Congress over the past year. While that debate led to passage of a comprehensive immigration reform bill in the Senate S. 744, the leadership of the House of Representatives has yet to put immigration legislation on the floor. This state of affairs is fine with those congressional representatives who seem to think that merely talking about immigration is enough. And if Congress were a debating society, perhaps talking would be sufficient. But Congress is entrusted with a far greater responsibility: passing laws that matter. This is particularly true in the case of immigration reform, which has such enormous humanitarian and economic implications. Further delay on immigration reform, especially when there is broad public support for reform, wastes not just time, but money and lives as well.Since the last major overhaul of the U.S. immigration system in 1986, the federal government has spent an estimated $186.8 billion on immigration enforcement. But those billions did not keep unauthorized immigrants out of the United States, nor persuade them to leave, because the 1986 reforms failed to create legal channels of immigration that could keep up with the growth of U.S. labor demand. As a result, over the past two-and-a-half decades, the number of unauthorized immigrants has tripled to more than 11 million. What the enforcement spending spree has done is to waste taxpayer dollars while creating a slow-motion humanitarian catastrophe at the southwest border and in immigration courtrooms across the country. Thousands of migrants have died in deserts, mountains, and rivers as they try to enter the country from Mexico because there are no legal avenues by which they can come here. Tens of thousands of U.S.-citizen children have had their lives torn apart by the deportation of their parents. On top of that, the full economic potential of unauthorized immigrants as workers, taxpayers, consumers, and entrepreneurs has been squandered because they are unable to earn legal status. In other words, as Congress continues to ponder the possibility of enacting immigration reform legislation, the broken machinery of the U.S. immigration system continues to destroy lives and families while draining the federal budget and undermining the economy. But this cannot go on forever. The cost of doing nothing is too great.The Cost in DollarsThe immigration-enforcement budget has increased massively since the early 1990s, but has not proven very effective at deterring unauthorized immigration.

via The Cost of Doing Nothing | Immigration Policy Center.

Comments Off

ABA Diversity Fellow

The American Bar Association (ABA): diversity fellow of the ABA Solo, Small Firm and General Practice Division in the 2014 bar year.

Comments Off

Value Added: Immigrants Create Jobs and Businesses, Boost Wages of Native-Born Workers | Immigration Policy Center

Updated January 2012 – Immigrants are not the cause of unemployment in the United States. Empirical research has demonstrated repeatedly that there is no correlation between immigration and unemployment. In fact, immigrants—including the unauthorized—create jobs through their purchasing power and their entrepreneurship, buying goods and services from U.S. businesses and creating their own businesses, both of which sustain U.S. jobs. The presence of new immigrant workers and consumers in an area also spurs the expansion of businesses, which creates new jobs. In addition, immigrants and native-born workers are usually not competing in the same job markets because they tend to have different levels of education, work in different occupations, specialize in different tasks, and live in different places. Because they complement each other in the labor market rather than compete, immigrants increase the productivity—and the wages—of native-born workers. In the words of economist Giovanni Peri, “immigrants expand the U.S. economy’s productive capacity, stimulate investment, and promote specialization that in the long run boosts productivity,” and “there is no evidence that these effects take place at the expense of jobs for workers born in the United States.”There is no correlation between immigration and unemployment.

via Value Added: Immigrants Create Jobs and Businesses, Boost Wages of Native-Born Workers | Immigration Policy Center.

Comments Off

Poll: Voters Like Immigration Plan, Skeptical Long-Term – Washington Wire – WSJ

Poll: Voters Like Immigration Plan, Skeptical Long-Term

By Sara Murray

Americans are largely supportive of a Senate plan to overhaul immigration laws, but they’re skeptical it will fix a broken system forever, a new poll shows.

Some 74% of registered voters surveyed said they supported a Senate immigration plan to increase border security, create new visa programs and offer a path to citizenship to immigrants who’ve passed background checks and paid fines. The results were part of a survey of 800 voters that will be publicly released Thursday.

While many of the voters surveyed looked favorably upon the Senate’s immigration plan, 73% said they didn’t believe it would fix the system once and for all.

via Poll: Voters Like Immigration Plan, Skeptical Long-Term – Washington Wire – WSJ.

Comments Off

Immigration bill filed in Senate; opponents hope to use delays to kill it – The Washington Post

Immigration bill filed in Senate

The bill has several major components, including a 13-year pathway to citizenship — predicated on new border-control measures — for up to 11 million immigrants in the country illegally; new visa programs for high- and low-skilled workers; reductions to some categories of family-based visas; and a greater emphasis on employment and education skills.

via Immigration bill filed in Senate; opponents hope to use delays to kill it – The Washington Post.

Comments Off

Guaranteeing Access to Health Care to Immigrant Women: A Necessary and Wise Investment » Immigration Impact

Guaranteeing Access to Health Care to Immigrant Women: A Necessary and Wise InvestmentEconomics, Family, Health Care, Integrationby Guillermo Cantor shutterstock_83108125In the current public debate regarding comprehensive immigration reform, the focus on immigrant access to health benefits has been almost exclusively limited to cost which is undeniably an important aspect and has rarely addressed the social gains that result from investing in a healthy population. For the most part, the health of immigrant women has been left out of the discussion, which is, in many aspects, problematic.It would be foolish and against America’s best interests to prevent immigrants from paying a fair share of their health care coverage.As reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 54.6 percent of foreign born women were labor force participants in 2010. In addition, immigrant women who perform their work in the domestic sphere help sustain the current workforce, raise the future workforce, care for the elderly and sick, and play a critical role in household well-being. Women’s contributions to the economy are, therefore, not only immediate, but will be felt in the future.According to the World Health Organization, women’s health is an urgent priority demanding greater attention. From a societal perspective, there are strong indicators that investing in women’s health and, especially, in maternal-newborn health not only constitutes a value in itself, but also may result in economic growth. This applies not only to women in general but to immigrant women in particular.

via Guaranteeing Access to Health Care to Immigrant Women: A Necessary and Wise Investment » Immigration Impact.

Comments Off

U.S. Army Offers Citizenship Track For Immigrants With Specialized Skills

U.S. Army Offers Citizenship Track For Immigrants With Specialized Skills

By SUSANNE M. SCHAFER 02/28/13 12:37 PM ET EST AP

Us Army Citizenship

Army Sgt. Keawanyda Speaks, left, helps recruit Carolyne Chelulei, fill out documents while visiting the Army recruiting office in Spartanburg, S.C. ( AP Photo/Susanne M. Schafer)

US Army, US Military, Army, Army Citizenship, Immigrants Military, Military Citizenship, Us Army Citizenship, Us Army Immigration, Politics News

SPARTANBURG, S.C. — Carolyne Chelulei came to the United States from Kenya on a student visa for a college education, but now the Army is offering her the chance to stay for good as a citizen.

The 23-year-old is one of several hundred immigrants whose specialized skills, either in languages or in their professional background, make them eligible for a Pentagon program that repays service in uniform with an accelerated path to citizenship.

via U.S. Army Offers Citizenship Track For Immigrants With Specialized Skills.

Comments Off

Congress passes, sends to president, bill renewing Violence Against Women Act – The Washington Post

By Associated Press, Updated: Thursday, February 28, 3:36 PM

WASHINGTON — House Republicans raised the white flag Thursday on extending domestic violence protections to gays, lesbians and transsexuals after months of resisting an expansion of the Violence Against Women Act.

GOP leaders, who had tried to limit the bill before last November’s election, gave the go-ahead for the House to accept a more ambitious Senate version written mainly by Democrats.

via Congress passes, sends to president, bill renewing Violence Against Women Act – The Washington Post.

Comments Off

SCOTUS: Chicago woman fighting deportation can’t benefit from 2010 decision on lawyer duty to warn – ABA Journal

Some criminal defendants whose lawyers failed to warn them about the immigration consequences of guilty pleas won’t be able to benefit from a 2010 U.S. Supreme Court decision. The defendants won’t benefit if their conviction was final before March 31, 2010, the date of the decision in Padilla v. Kentucky, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a 7-2 opinion (PDF) issued Wednesday. Padilla had held that lawyers have a Sixth Amendment obligation to warn about possible deportation as a result of guilty pleas. Padilla is not retroactive because it established a new rule, according to the majority opinion by Justice Elena Kagan. When we decided Padilla, Kagan wrote, “we answered a question about the Sixth Amendment’s reach that we had left open, in a way that altered the law of most jurisdictions and our reasoning reflected [what] we were doing.”

via SCOTUS: Chicago woman fighting deportation can\’t benefit from 2010 decision on lawyer duty to warn – ABA Journal.

Comments Off

ABA- Family Law Committee (Board Member)

August – 2012, Attorney Madden was appointed as a board member to the Family Law Division of the American Bar Association.   http://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/gpsolo/mo_leaders/fy2013_gpsolo_leadership_directory_rev_12_20_12.authcheckdam.pdf

Comments Off
Next Page »